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Tips for moving your home garden

For some of us, plants are like pets. We care for our plants, we love them and we are attached to them. When we move, we want our plants to move with us just like other people want to bring their pets with them. But plants are fragile and need lots of attention during a move. Not to mention, most moving companies Ontario simply won’t move plants. So what is a plant-lover to do? Is moving your home garden possible? And how? Here are some of the best tips on what to do with your plants when moving.

The difficulties with moving your home garden

As anyone who owns plant can tell you, plants are very fragile. They are easy to damage and difficult to recover from damage. This isn’t ideal when you’re moving because the odds of something getting damaged during a move are quite high.

Three potted plants.
Plants are fragile and difficult to move.

Plants also require soil, water, air, and sunlight. You can’t find any of those in the back of a moving truck. And while most of your stuff can be stored temporarily, putting plants in a storage unit is not something any storage Sudbury recommends since conditions are far from ideal for plants.

Plants and professional movers

Most moving companies won’t move plants, especially not long distance. The reason for this is twofold: movers don’t want to be responsible for something that is likely not to handle the move very well and movers don’t want to deal with something that requires near-constant attention during relocation. If you want to move your plants, you will, therefore, probably need to do so yourself or hire specialty movers. Unsure if your moving company will handle plants? You can always check out the services they offer or ask them directly!

What to do when moving your home garden isn’t possible

You must accept that it is not always possible to move plants. Sometimes it’s better for both you and the plant that it doesn’t make that journey. When moving your home garden isn’t possible, give your plants away to friends, family members, and neighbors who will appreciate them and look after them.

Take seeds and cuttings

Just because you can’t take the whole plant with you, doesn’t mean you can’t take a piece of it. Collect seeds and cuttings from your favorite plants! That way they can come along with you in shape and form that is easier to move than a whole adult plant.

Moving your home garden: how to

While plants don’t feel in the traditional sense, they certainly do react to external stimuli and they won’t take kindly to being (literally) uprooted and taken to a new home. So when you’re moving them, be careful and gentle with them.

Moving inside plants

Moving potted inside plants is, of course, far easier than moving outside plants. Most pots are easy enough to move even when they are quite large. The biggest issue is then transporting the plants. For short distances, almost any moving truck will do. Just water your plants heavily prior to moving them and drive carefully so they won’t jostle too much.

Potted cactus.
Moving potted plants is easier than moving garden plants.

For long distances, however, you want the back of the truck to have controlled temperatures and humidity. Hiring specialty movers may be preferable to DIY-ing in these cases.

Moving garden plants

Moving your home garden is a bit trickier when it comes to plants planted outside. Naturally, you will need to uproot them, transport them and replant them once you arrive. This can be quite stressful for your plants as well as for you.

Plan for the right season

Exposed roots are vulnerable to direct sunlight and prone to drying out. It is, therefore, best to avoid moving plants in summer when temperatures are high, the sun is strong and the air is dry. If you can control when you’re moving and want to take your plants with you, plan your relocation for spring or fall.

Trim before moving

You want your plants to be in the best possible condition prior to the move to give them the best chance of surviving the relocation. So even if you trim them regularly, make sure to check them before the move. Take off anything that shouldn’t be there and is a waste of the plant’s energy such as dead leaves or excess stems.

Water before uprooting

You don’t want to drown your plants, but giving them a proper soak before uprooting them is a good idea. Water your plants heavily the night before you take them out of the ground so they will have some water to hold on to during the move. If your plants are dry, they will have a hard time with the stress of the relocation.

Uproot carefully

Water your plants again before uprooting them to make sure the ground is moist. Use a towel to dig a wide ring around your plant where you won’t hurt any roots. Remove the plant with as much soil as you can, then immediately place it in a pot or a wet burlap sack.

Uprooted plant.
Leave as much soil on the roots as you can.

Care during transport

It is very possible that your plants will need some kind of care during transport, especially if you’re moving your home garden long distance. So check up on your plants during stops to make sure they haven’t tipped over, fallen, damaged or wilted. Keep some basic gardening tools on you in case something does happen!

Replant quickly

It is crucial that you get your plants back in the ground as soon as possible. Even if you’re unsure of where you want to place them, replant them as soon as you arrive at your new home. You can always move them later if need be! Keep the soil wet and make sure it isn’t too compact and restrictive to the roots.

Help your plants adjust

Just like you will need to adapt to colder climates, your plants need to adjust after the move. Shade them from direct sunlight in the first few days and make sure you water them regularly. Keep in mind that plants don’t handle this kind of stress well and you may lose a few along the way. But if you take proper care, most of them will successfully move in with you!